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Illicit Drug Trafficking Contributing to High Addiction Rates

Illicit Drug Trafficking Contributing to High Addiction Rates

The drug trafficking business in Mexico is worth an estimated $50 billion a year — and analysts predict that without it, Mexico’s economy would shrink by 63 percent. With 32 percent of all American inmates either under the influence or in possession of illicit drugs when arrested, it’s no surprise that drug rehab centers are a primary option for families everywhere. Illegal drugs are invading major cities everywhere, from places like Los Angeles to the East Coast. But what role is the rise in drug trafficking playing within the sphere of addiction?

Illicit Drugs Cost America $193 Billion a Year

Addiction to illegal drugs, most notably heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine cost the United States an average of $193 billion in 2015 alone. These costs were attributed to drug rehab centers, crime costs, work reduction and health care associated with detox, treatment and medication management.

Methamphetamine Abuse Overtakes Los Angeles

In densely populated cities such as Los Angeles, heroin was the drug of choice for 19.8 percent of people checking into drug rehab centers, and cocaine accounted for 6.8 percent of admits. Methamphetamine was the most popular drug of choice for people in drug rehab centers in Los Angeles, with 32.8 percent of admits citing methamphetamine as their preferred drug of choice.

Illicit Drugs a Foremost Cause of American Deaths

Law enforcement and DEA officers work around the clock to curtail the amount of illicit drugs being moved undetected across our borders, but the epidemic has still risen to unprecedented levels within recent years. The DEA arrests over 30,000 people every year for crimes related to the sale and distribution of illegal drugs. Unsurprisingly, illicit drug use and addiction is one of the foremost causes of death within the United States. Homicide, suicide, HIV infection, violence, motor-vehicle injury and mental health issues only begin to scratch at the surface of illicit drug-related consequences, further cementing just how powerful the link is between illegal drug trafficking and the current addiction epidemic.